Retail sales pick up in January

In January 2017, Latvian retailers raised their aggregate calendar-adjusted sales by 3.7 percent against the same period last year at constant prices, the Central Statistics Bureau (CSB) said February 28.

Food retailers saw their sales decline by 0.1 percent over the given period, whereas retailers of non-food products raised January sales by 5.9 percent year-on-year.

According to the CSB, the most significant sales growth in the non-food product group was recorded in retail sale of clothing, footwear and leather goods (of 12.5 percent), as well as in retail sale of information and communication equipment (of 10.6 percent). In turn, the sharpest drop was experienced in retail sale via stalls and markets (of 14.2 percent) and in non-specialized stores with non-food products predominating (of 2.6 percent). Automotive fuel sales increased by 8.8 percent.

The Latvian retailers’ aggregate calendar-unadjusted sales at current prices increased by 8.8 percent.

Compared to December 2016, Latvia’s seasonally adjusted retail sales rose by 2.4 percent at current prices as food retailers saw their sales grow 4.4 percent and the sales of retailers of non-food products quickened 1.1 percent in January 2017.

Over the month, growth was recorded in retail sale of information and communication equipment (of 13.8 percent), in non-specialized stores with non-food products predominating (of 8.1 percent), in retail sale of clothing, footwear and leather goods (of 5.3 percent), in retail sale of hardware, paints and glass (of 2.5 percent), as well as in retail sale of automotive fuel (of 1.2 percent). In turn, turnover declined in retail sale via mail order houses or via Internet (of 11.0 percent), in retail sale via stalls and markets (of 7.3 percent), as well as in retail sale of pharmaceutical and medical goods (of 2.1 percent).

Compared to December 2016, the total retail trade turnover at current prices (not taking into account seasonality) decreased by 18.0 percent in January 2017.

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