'Forest brothers' in the CIA archives - Caught between the CIA and MI6

The enormous cache of formerly classified Cold War-era documents released by the US' Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) early this year also describes Latvia's 'forest brothers' - a resistance movement to occupying Soviet power following World War II. Some of these documents also probe the role both the CIA and the Soviet security agency KGB played within the movement. 

'Forest brothers' in the CIA archives - A letter from the forest

The enormous cache of formerly classified Cold War-era documents released by the US' Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) early this year also describes Latvia's 'forest brothers' - a resistance movement to occupying Soviet power following World War II. Some of these documents also probe the role both the CIA and the Soviet security agency KGB played within the movement. 

'Forest brothers' in the CIA archives - Western aid to the resistance

The enormous cache of formerly classified Cold War-era documents released by the US' Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) early this year also describes Latvia's 'forest brothers' - a resistance movement to occupying Soviet power following World War II. Some of these documents also probe the role both the CIA and the Soviet security agency KGB played within the movement. 

'Forest brothers' in the CIA archives - setting up and organizing the resistance

The enormous cache of formerly classified Cold War-era documents released by the US' Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) early this year also describes Latvia's 'forest brothers' - a resistance movement to occupying Soviet power following World War II. Some of these documents also probe the role both the CIA and the Soviet security agency KGB played within the movement. 

'Forest brothers' explained

A recent NATO film sketching the story of resistance to occupying Soviet power following World War II caused predictable hysteria among Russian official circles. Diplomats and state-controlled news channels wasted no time in re-hashing their crude and conveniently self-congratulatory interpretation of history.

Help with the hunt for Latvia's greatest trees

Trees have a special place in Latvia, not only in the economy but also as cultural monuments: and many of the largest, rarest, most historic and most characterful examples have special protected status as a result.

NATO makes film about 'forest brothers'

The NATO military alliance, of which Latvia is part, has put a new 8-minute film online telling the story of the 'forest brothers' - partisans who continued armed resistance to the Soviet occupation of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania after the end of the Second World War.

Remains of fifty World War I soldiers excavated

Archaeological excavations have uncovered the remains of fifty World War I soldiers--Latvian soldiers of that time are often referred to as the Latvian Riflemen--at Ložmetējkalns, a historical battle site where thousands of Latvian soldiers fought the German army under Tsarist Russia, reported LTV on July 9.

Latvia marks day of deportations

Ceremonies and services took place across Latvia June 14 remembering the thousands of people deported to Siberia by the Soviet Union.

How Latgale chose to join Latvia

May 9-10 marks the 100th anniversary of the First Latgale Congress. It was then, in 1917, that Latgalians chose to unite with the other Latvian regions. What follows is a Latvian Radio strand highlighting the differences between Latgalians and other Latvian speakers, as well as tracing their role in the formation of the Latvian state.

New book attempts real history of Holocaust camp

International Holocaust Memorial day was marked with a series events across Latvia Wednesday, including the launch of a new book that attempts to give an accurate account of the Salaspils camp near Riga, variously described as a death camp, forced labor camp, concentration camp or prison camp.

50 years since legendary Staburags cliffs disappeared

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Pļaviņas Hydroelectric power plant (HPP), built in 1965. The plant is responsible for one quarter of Latvia's electricity output - and for completely submerging Staburags - a national symbol comparable to the Lorelei in Germany.