What do Latvians eat for breakfast?

Data compiled by Disease Prevention and Control Center (SPKC) shows that 77.8% of Latvians eat breakfast regularly. But what is commonly found on the plate? Latvian Television broadcast Pārtikas revidents surveyed the public for answers.

Perhaps not surprisingly, of nearly sixty received photo responses, the majority featured bread or pastry-like products, especially open-faced sandwiches on rye bread. Rye bread is a staple of the average Latvian diet, included in the Latvian Cultural Canon, EC Register of Guaranteed Traditional Specialties, has its museums and trails, and legends. Quite a few Latvians indeed seem to start their day with rye bread and toppings - butter, cucumbers, tomatoes, cold meats, cheese.

However, some prefer lighter (in terms of flour) pastries - from toast to cinnamon buns to Danish pastries and even cakes for the sweet-toothed.

Another popular breakfast favorite among Latvians is porridge. While oats and rice are eaten around the world, Latvians also like to simmer less popular grains, such as millet, barley, rye, buckwheat, in different combinations and blends. Porridge is commonly topped by something sweet, such as jam or fresh fruit.

Eggs are a breakfast staple around the world, including Latvia. Sunny side up, scrambled, hard or soft-boiled - many pair their eggs with vegetables or meat, such as bacon.

Fewer people prefer a grab-and-go breakfast from the store: salads and sausages. The least common breakfast food in this survey seemed to be breakfast cereals, even though elsewhere in the world they are rather common. 

SPKC's information shows that senior people are most likely to eat breakfast regularly. Breakfast is least popular among people aged 25 to 34. But the LTV Pārtikas revidents survey concludes that viewers of this show are keen on rye bread, porridge, eggs and vegetables on their breakfast table.

 

 

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