Election results pose problem for President
Latvian President Raimonds Vējonis will face a tricky decision in the near future when he will have to nominate a potential Prime Minister to attempt to form a new government coalition.
Election results: the expert view
With more than nine-tenths of the results in Latvia's 13th Saeima elections counted, the share of the vote won by each party looks clearer by the minute. Harmony topped the poll with 19% of the vote followed by newcomers KPV LV on 14%, the New Conservatives on 13%, For Development/For! on 11%, the National Alliance on 11%, the Greens and Farmers Union on 10% and New Unity on 6% (based on incomplete data).
Viewpoint: Hopeful moves towards the changing of the old guard
With so much attention currently focused on parliamentary elections due to take place October 6 - despite the common opinion that that they will result in very little change -  it is possible that some more important, if less obviously significant events are taking place under our noses right now.
Kučinskis: fight against corruption "one of main priorities of the government"
In Brussels on February 23 Latvian Prime Minister Māris Kučinskis was on a damage limitation exercise. For a week newspapers across Europe and beyond had been running front-page stories about sensational developments in Latvia's financial sector involving allegations of money-laundering, bribery, conspiracy, corruption and even, according to the government's own sources, a "probable" co-ordinated campaign to defame Latvia's name - which is a bit like saying everyone is making too much out of the money-laundering, bribery, conspiracy and corruption.
ABLV is a big deal
Next time a bank tells you how clever it is, how it uses all the latest technology, how its accounts are super secure and how slick and smart and highly-trained its employees are, you might choose to disbelieve the claim.
Latvian- and Russian-language media: contrasting stories
February 1 saw the launch of new research from the Center for East European Policy Studies (CEEPS or APPC in Latvian) examining the similarities and differences between Latvian-language and Russian-language coverage of international news in the Latvian media space.
Apathy and sloth at Riga City Council
"Smile, it's going to be alright!" Riga vice-mayor Andris Ameriks (Honor to Serve Riga) told me, happily, as he went back to a meeting where the 2018 Riga budget was being passed on a late Wednesday afternoon, after he had had a hearty meal at the Rātslaukums cafe opposite to the City Hall.
Resolving Rigvir

It is unthinkable that a medical professional -- or even a business professional -- would intentionally foist a bogus cure onto a cancer patient.

Whatever happened to PAFI?

Back in January 2016 LSM reported on Riga-based Peace Ambassadors for Iraq (PAFI), an organization that describes itself as "an internationally-oriented, non-governmental organization that is dedicated to achieving peace in Iraq and the Middle East."

Things of Latvia: Latvian Radio Theater

In recent years I have developed an obsession, probably unhealthy, with 'Latvian Radio Theater'. These are radio plays exhumed from the archive and broadcast after 10 p.m. in order to fill up time that would otherwise be hard to fill. They deserve a wider audience.

Why I am batting for #Balvi2027

Exciting news June 14. Latvia will have another European Capital of Culture in 2027. That gives us just ten years of flattery and free goody bags in order to win an honor that would be ours anyway.  

An audience with Edvard Munch in Daugavpils

Really I should have taken the bus to Daugavpils, as this started at a bus stop. Specifically, it started at a bus stop in Cesis, a smallish town located in what might be described as north-central Latvia. It ended in Daugavpils, a large-ish city in what could certainly be described as the far south-east of the country.

March 16 rolls around again
As another March 16 prepares to roll around, exactly the same sequence of events as usual is set to unfold - hopefully. Because any deviation from the norm can only mean trouble.