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Sidnejs the wallaby remains at large in Liepāja

Wallaby Sidnejs (Sydney), who hopped off into the wild from a mini-zoo near Liepāja two weeks ago, is still at large, his former keepers at the Atomi mini-zoo told LSM July 16.

As LSM already reported, on July 2, Sidnejs had set his sight on the gate lock, which some visitors had allegedly meddled with, flew right through it, and headed straight down the highway toward Liepāja. 

Though groups of volunteers were assembled for grid-searches and Liepāja residents have been actively playing the game of Wallaby GO and reporting places in the town where Sidnejs was seen, he was nowhere to be found when the zoo representatives arrived in order to convene a kangaroo court and take him home. 

According to Atomi, Sidnejs has been spotted on the beach getting a tan, at the Jūrmala park in Liepāja catching some shade, near the Liepāja bicycle trail packing in some exercise, and even in the environs of the beach bar Red Sun Buffet. Hopefully, the one-and-a-half-year-old was not served any alcoholic beverages or -- even worse -- energy drinks.

The latest sighting, Atomi said, was July 14 at Liepājas Jūrmalas park. Since then his whereabouts remain a mystery.

Atomi has issued a bounty of EUR 100 for the successful capture of the bushranger, but it is strongly advised against physically restraining him or going too near, as, like all high-profile fugitives on the lam he could become dangerous if cornered. 

Atomi said that the best-case scenario would be enclosing the wallaby in a yard or other restricted territory if he wanders into one (make sure your gate locks are Sidnejs-proof!) or, if not possible, keeping an eye on him and discreetly following until the zoo representatives arrive. The phone number to report sightings of Sidnejs is 25560040, or you can call the Liepāja municipal police's rapid-reaction wallaby squad on 63420269.

This is not the first time Latvia has been gripped by escaped wallaby fever. Back in 2018 a mystery marsupial appeared in an orchard. Meanwhile one of our most popular stories this year concerned the sleeping habits of kangaroos.

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