Latvian central bank becomes house of the rising sun

There is a house in New Orleans they call The Rising Sun... and there's another one in Rīga they call the Latvian central bank (Latvijas Banka, LB).

The latter is issuing a 2 euro commemorative coin called "The Rising Sun" dedicated to the history of the Coat of Arms of Latvia, rather than the decadent den of ill-repute.

"The motif of a rising sun was very popular at the time of the foundation of the Latvian state," says LB in describing its latest piece of loose change. "The rising sun symbolised the new country. With the help of artist Ivars Drulle, the sun motif created by artist Ansis Cīrulis and emerging as one of the basic elements of the Coat of Arms of Latvia has reborn into the commemorative coin 'The Rising Sun'."

Rising sun coin

The national side of the commemorative coins issued by Latvijas Banka features the inscription "LATVIJA", and the edge of the coin, like all other 2 euro circulation coins of the Republic of Latvia, features the inscription "DIEVS * SVĒTĪ * LATVIJU * (God bless Latvia)". The new 2 euro coin was struck by Koninklijke Nederlandse Munt in the Netherlands.

Each year, every euro area country is entitled to issue two 2 euro circulation coins of special design or commemorative coins as well as one more commemorative coin within a joint program of several euro area countries.

The new commemorative coins will be circulated in the same way as any other circulation money, reaching commercial and other enterprises as well as the general public through banks. The coins will be available for exchange starting from 8.30 a.m. on 17 September at the Cashier's Offices of Latvijas Banka in Riga and Liepāja. 300,000 examples will be released, with 7,000 given souvenir packing. The price of the coin at the Cashier's Offices of Latvijas Banka will be 7.90 euro.

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Economy
Economy