Port boss keeps his job despite corruption case

The longstanding Chief Executive Officer of the Freeport of Riga, Leonids Loginovs, staed in his job Thursday after winning the backing of the port's board despite the opening of a criminal case against him by anti-corruption officers. 

It's far from the first time Loginovs has beaten away efforts to unseat him from the highly lucrative position that has made him one of Latvia's richest individuals over the last two decades. 

During a Freeport of Riga board meeting Thursday, the board reviewed a letter sent from the Prosecutor's Office, which officially confirmed the opening of a criminal case against both Loginovs and his deputy Aigars Pecaks.

In a decision greeted with surprise by awaiting media, the board decided to keep both port officials in their posts.

As LETA was informed by Mareks Gailitis, advisor to Riga vice-mayor and Freeport of Riga board chairman Andris Ameriks, the board had received a letter confirming that a criminal case has been opened against Loginovs and Pecaks, but no restrictions have been set in regard to fulfilling their work related duties.

The Freeport of Riga board is made up of eight members - four from the Riga City Council and four from the state. If a majority cannot be reached, the decisive vote is made by the board chairman - Ameriks.

As reported, the State Police have requested the Prosecutor's Office to prosecute Loginovs, as well as his deputy Aigars Pecaks, on graft charges.

If convicted, the port officials could be sentenced to up to four years in prison.

LETA also reported, this past October, the State Police's Economic Crimes Department submitted a case to the Prosecutor's Office against two Freeport of Riga officials, who are suspected of using their official positions in bad faith for monetary gain.

The police point out that back in 2013, the State Police completed an analysis of findings received from the State Audit Office and decided to launch a criminal process on possible violations at the Freeport of Riga.

The Economic Crimes Prevention Department opened a criminal process pursuant to two Criminal Law sections: criminal offenses of an economic nature and criminal offenses committed in state authority.

Economy
Economy