Big rail project gets 'connectivity backbone' to do list

The Rail Baltica joint venture RB Rail AS said April 25 it now has a list of recommended things to do after commissioning a study.

However, RB Rail adopted a much more managerial-speak approach in its announcement of this straightforward fact, saying: 

"The Spanish infrastructure consultancy Ineco has delivered a landmark study on the opportunities to maximize the synergies from simultaneous deployment of various infrastructure developments along the Rail Baltica greenfield railway corridor."

It then added a few more high-class ingredients into its word salad, saying:

"The study provides actionable recommendations to Baltic and European authorities on leveraging the 800+km long cross-border railway corridor to co-create also other synchronized and complementary infrastructure along this emerging connectivity backbone in Northeast Europe."

According to Kaspars Briškens, Head of Strategy and Development for Rail Baltica:

“Rail Baltica is not just a railway. It’s a generational opportunity to create a new multi-infrastructure cross-border connectivity backbone for Northeast Europe. Alongside delivering the new multimodal transport corridor itself, Rail Baltica must also be used as a “Dig Once” platform to co-deliver a new standard of digital, energy and industrial connectivity – an example other megaprojects in the future may follow, in Europe and beyond.”


Setting aside the buzzword blitz used to announce the study, you can read it for yourself at the Rail Baltica website: https://www.railbaltica.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/RB116-E-STU-Z-00002.pdf or if the full 133-page report is a bit much, you can restrict yourself to the condensed 20-page executive summary: https://www.railbaltica.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/RB116-E-STU-Z-00001.pdf

The reports also feature some amazing graphics such as the one below.

Graphic from Rail Baltica report

As previously reported by LSM, the study cost 116,000 euros. RB Rail is a joint venture of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania to build a modern high-speed railway link at a cost of 5.8 billion euros.

 

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