UPDATED: Maidan info boards vandalized in Riga

Information boards on display right outside Latvia's main government building were destroyed as soon as they were revealed Monday, apparently by local Russians objecting to what they described as a "Right Sector" flag.

In video footage posted online Tuesday, two Russian-speaking men, one wearing a balaclava and both with disguised voices can be seen destroying information boards about the Ukrainian 'Maidan' uprising and then slicing a red-and-black flag in half with a knife.

Despite the sensitive location right outside the Cabinet Office, no police or other security appears to be on hand as the vandals complete their work.

The footage was posted online apparently by the perpetrators of the act with the explanation:

"Me and my friend spotted a "Right sector" flag today in my city - we were full of emotions."

Police said they have opened an investigation into the incident and appealed for members of the public with information to come forward.

Foreign Minister Edgars Rinkevics tweeted that he had spoken to the Ukrainian ambassador about the matter and that those responsible should be punished.

The small exhibition, titled "People of Maidan" was originally slated to to appear in May but was postponed. It has already appeared in Kyiv and Santiago, Chile.

It was produced by US citizen Sergey Melnikoff. While his own website makes grand claims for his critical and commercial reputation, LSM could find no major monographs of his work available other than those published by himself.

His website also says the Maidan pictures have been compiled in a limited edition portfolio to retail for $500 apiece.

He is no stranger to controversy having previously been linked to a scandal in Kyrgyzstan in which he claimed to have sold a landscape picture to the cash-strapped central Asian republic for $300,000.

A YouTube channel run by Melnikoff offers visitors the chance to "Become the owner of the most expensive photograph in the world!" by sending the photographer an email address.

"Your e-mail address will automatically be participating in determining the future owner of the most expensive photograph in the world which is valued at 3,346,475 US dollars," it claims, while displaying what appears to be a series of unexceptional landscapes.

 

 

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